Archival Gyclee and Dye Transfer Aluminum Prints

Fine Art

I have been a fine art photographer since I first held a camera in the mid-sixties. I have worked consistently over the years with a steady progression with my explorations of expanding photographic space, not only with my inventions but with finding ways to combine and compose images digitally to further visual communication.

There are seven series,

  • The Total Environment Spherical Series
  • The Two Page Spreads
  • The South West Series
  • The New York Series
  • The Iconography Series
  • The Wall Series
  • The Prism Series

My fine-art work is currently available for sale on www.Saatchiart.com, and all of my work can be viewed there as well as on this site.

Interested parties may also contact me at dpwillis1@verizon.net, if interested in purchasing individual or multiple items. Prices are negotiable.

Most of the photographs are archival Gyclee prints on watercolor paper and are immediately available for purchase. These include those in the “Spherical”, The “South West”, “The New York”, the “Iconography”, and the “Two Page spreads” series.

My recent work in the “Wall” and the “Prism” series are for large scale aluminum prints that will require up to two weeks production time to deliver. These large prints range up to three feet by four feet in size and are ready to hang.

THE EARLY SPHERICALS 1970s-1980s

In the early seventies, I became curious about what it would be like to photograph with a camera that could record a complete environment. There were no “virtual reality” cameras available at that time, so I designed and constructed several versions of pin-hole cameras that could do this. My final version was a six-sided camera. Each panel covers 60 degrees horizontal by 180 degrees vertical.

I learned much working with this camera as per how to pre-visualize the compositions, especially in terms of deciding upon the ”subject” and how to relate that to the extreme lines of perspective that were created. One of the problems with a total environment camera is the extra data that is captured in the upper and lower parts of the image. Map designers for centuries have had to deal with this issue by creating various kinds of map “projections” to create the illusion of contiguous space.

My solution to this problem recently has been to digitally scan these six 4” by 10” negatives and use Photoshop to stitch the panels together. All spherical images are compositions created either by computer programs or in my case cutting and blending the overlapping parts.

I found the camera also useful to create external as well as interior spherical images. By moving the camera around a tree to take the six images, I was able to “unwrap” the tree. Another example is the image of the Weeping Purple Birch tree, where I placed the camera under the overhanging branches and made the tree stand up straight, creating a somewhat ominous anthropomorphic form.

The work with this total environment camera guided me later on how to use Photoshop to compose extended panoramic images.

THE TWO PAGE SPREADS 1970s-1980s

At the same time, when I was working with my spherical camera, I continued to take photographs with my 35mm analog cameras. I compiled an extensive archive of color negatives of many subject matters at many locations. When editing this work, I recognized certain repeating forms and related subject matter in the archive.

In California, my first influential teacher of photography was John Upton. John had been a close follower of Minor White, and he presented to his class one of Minor White’s ideas that every photographer repeats in their work “core forms” of which they are often unaware.

So as I went through this editing process, I found many images in my work that seemed to confirm John Upton’s and Minor White’s theories.

The other concept that was interesting to me was the opportunity to make use of visual metaphoric relationships. ‘Visual metaphors’ was one of the repeated lessons taught by Nathan Lyons, my teacher at the Visual Studies Workshop in Rochester, New York.

He discussed how these are used in commercial work and that they should not be ignored by fine art photographers. The two-page spreads contain a combination of discovering “core forms” and to produce visual metaphorical depictions.

This exploration was an important step in my work and led me to seek out other ways to create photographic compositions.

THE SOUTH WEST SERIES 1980s-1990s

For many years I have visited the South West to take photographs. The South West is one of the most exciting regions in which to work. The area has the influences of Native American, Spanish and Anglo cultures mingling together and residing in beautiful landscapes of mountains, mesas, river gorges, and deserts.

As a photographer, I was conscious of the importance of gathering what I call the basic “elements” of the area. However, I found it exceedingly difficult to find viewpoints from which to take a camera to combine any more than a few of the elements from any one vantage point.

Painters, on the other hand, are entirely free to compose on their canvases these same elements in any combination they want.

The solution for me was to resort to the powerful digital compositing technologies that were just becoming available to photographers.

From my archive of color negatives, I scanned these images and loaded them into my computer and then had the ability to create “virtual landscapes” as well as other compositions that I have labeled “planoscapes”.

The New York Series 2006 - TO PRESENT

In 2006 having exhausted going through my archive of analog photographs, I purchased a digital camera. Now I began working and shooting with “purpose” or “intent”.

Living in New York, I had the luxury of starting with an idea or concept for a composition and would go out and gather the necessary images. This is an entirely different way to work.

The Iconography Series 2006 TO THE PRESENT

These types of images lend themselves to be created as what I call “planoscapes”. The basis for their design structures is more about relationships and are not dependant on creating a real or virtual landscape, although in some cases,

there can be some elements of a landscape contained. I have put some of the iconographic images as historical comparatives and other times just as themselves. Some of these images were composed just because it was fun.

The Wall Series - 2019 TO THE PRESENT

These large aluminum prints are designed to hang directly on your wall and command a prominent presence in your room. Frames are not necessary because they have hangers attached.

The Prism Series 2019 TO THE PRESENT

These images were produced using my MirrorsPod invention and utilize the multiple prismatic designs and shapes that are produced by this device. Working with prismatic imagery is in many ways the complete reverse of working with panoramas and is another important way to explore photographic space.

These large aluminum prints are designed to hang directly on your wall and command a prominent presence in your room. Frames are not necessary because they have hangers attached.